10 Things Ted Williams Can Teach About Hitting

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Ted Williams Side View

Ted Williams will be remembered as one of the greatest hitters of all time. Teddy Ballgame had eight 30 HR seasons, he reached base safely in 92.2% of his games, and had a .404 OBP during the WORST 162 game stretch of his career. He spent five of his prime years serving his country in the Navy & Marines, three in WWII from 1943-1946 and two in the Korean War from 1952-1953.

My favorite Ted Williams stat of all time….

All of these stats are courtesy of @theaceofspaeder on twitter, follow Ryan for more great baseball stats.

To match his hitting ability, Teddy Ballgame also had a knowledge of the swing that was ahead of his time. Here are ten knowledge bombs Ted Williams dropped on us mere mortals.

  1. On Launch Angles

“The toughest thing is to pull the ball in the air. Thats the premium, par excellent hit.”

Ted Williams Side View

2. More on Launch Angles

“we’re going to hit it hard and we’re going to hit it in the air.”

3. On Patience And Quickness

“The longer a batter can wait on a pitch, the less chance there is that he will be fooled”

4. On Using The Hips

“The way you bring your hips into the swing is directly proportionate to the power you generate. I never saw a good hitter that didn’t have good hip-cock(hip coil).”

Ted Williams Hip Coil

5. On Bat Path

“A slight upswing is best”

6. On Mentality

“There’s only one way to become a hitter. Go up to the plate and get mad. Get mad at yourself and mad at the pitcher.”

7. On Confidence

“If there was ever a man born to be a better hitter, it was me”

8. On Hitting In General

“Hitting is the most important part of the game. It’s where the big money is, where much of the status is, and the fan interest.”

9. On Hitting The Fastball

“You have to hit the fastball to play in the big leagues.”

10. On Legacy

A man has to have goals – for a day, for a lifetime – and that was mine, to have people say, ‘There goes Ted Williams, the greatest hitter who ever lived.”

Williams passed away in 2002, leaving behind 2,654 hits and even more wisdom. He was a true student of the game spending hours practicing his craft. In a time when analytics were not a big part of the game, Ted Williams often knew more about opposing pitchers than they did about themselves. More of Ted Williams wisdom can be found in his book The Science of Hitting, on amazon.

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