College Baseball Recruiting Timeline

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College Baseball Recruiting Timeline

We created the college baseball recruiting timeline to learn step-by-step how to get recruited for college baseball. We”ll break this timeline down into the four seasons (spring, summer, fall, winter) and of course the four years of high school. 

Browse by Year: Click any of the links below to jump to each year.

Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Senior Year

Freshman

Get acclimated to the high school environment. Develop good classroom and home study habits. Additionally, it’s important you learn time management even though at this point, you”ll probably have a lot of time on your hands.

Top college programs will be building their early watch list. If you are not on this elite list and you want to play for UCLA, LSU, or Oregon State you have a lot of work to do. Make sure you’re aware of the rules about contacting coaches. D1 and D2 coaches can’t personally contact you until your Junior year, however you can still get in touch with them.

Fall

  • Introduce yourself to the varsity coach if you haven’t already. Attend as much of your high school baseball teams fall training as possible.
  • Locate a facility that offers baseball and training instruction. We constantly update our list of the top facilities to train at in your area. Click here to find one near you
  • Train, Train, Train. While most players will play fall ball, or do nothing. Avoid stagnancy like the plague, taking time off of training will cause atrophy in the body. Gaining strength will be the difference between JV or Varsity. Make skill work a priority, you”ll get plenty of games in during the spring and summer months.

Winter

  • Continue training or play another sport. Studies have shown that year round throwing can increase arm injuries so focus on fixing muscular imbalances and gaining strength.
  • Continue working hard in the classroom. Get ahead in your classes before the season starts. Take as many AP/Honors classes and maintain a high GPA.
  • Send college baseball coaches emails letting them know you’re interested in their program. The goal of this is to have them add you to their email list

Spring

  • Begin Freshman season, hustle your butt off and learn how to be coachable early.
  • Your training in-season should be different than the off-season, however if you expect to make more gains in-season and maintain your gains from the off-season, then you should still train hard in-season.
  • Attend local college baseball games or while on spring break vacation. Watch the level of skill and how college baseball players carry themselves. Evaluate your skills against theirs.

Summer

  • Play summer baseball against the best competition possible. If you fail to make a competitive travel team you should be training at least 5 days a week.
  • Train hard during the week. Get on a consistent throwing and strength & conditioning program regardless of if you play or not.
  • Practice proper nutrition early in your high school career. Learn how to maintain weight or gain it if you need to.
  • Attend a college baseball camp and a perfect game or PBR event.

Sophomore

Once you have a full freshman season under your belt, you should have a good feel of what level you’re at. If you don’t know, ask your coach for an honest evaluation. Did you play varsity as a freshman or play JV for a top HS Program? If the answers no, you need to focus on training more than exposure. Create a list of 50-100 schools you’d like to play at AND attend as a student.

Fall

  • Continue to hit the books and practice good study habits
  • Follow the same off-season schedule as your freshman year. Take 10-12 weeks off from throwing, especially if you’re a pitcher. Focus on regaining lost mobility and fixing muscular imbalances.
  • Meet with your high school counselor. Let them know you wish to play baseball in college so they can put you on track to take the correct courses.
  • Take the PreSAT/ACT if offered by your school so you can get a baseline of your probable SAT/ACT score.
  • Research scholarships and financial aid, find schools that will fit you budget and that offer majors you’re interested in.

Winter

  • Train hard or play another sport and begin your throwing program after taking a break from throwing in the fall.
  • Continue to take challenging classes and perform well in the classroom.

Spring

    • Create a skills video. Keep it short, no music, and include all the information a scout will need in the video. Here’s a great example from Driveline Baseball

  • Give 100% during your high school season. Send college coaches your high school schedule. Don’t let up in anticipation for summer baseball and showcases.

Summer

  • Play for a competitive summer baseball team. Send college coaches your schedule and let them know if you’ll be attending any of their camps
  • Get in the gym at least 5 times a week and improve everyday. You don’t need to lift heavy everyday. Spend time focusing on mobility, agility, and speed.
  • Make unofficial college visits
  • Attend college baseball camps and let your summer baseball coach know you want to play in college

Junior

Junior year is the most important year for high school baseball recruits. At this point, offers have started going out, the elite players have started to separate themselves and college coaches have a pretty good idea of who they want to recruit. If you haven’t already been in contact with your dream schools, it’s probably time to narrow down your list to local schools, D2’s, D3’s, Juco’s, and NAIA’s.

 

Fall

  • Written contact to college baseball coaches is allowed on September 1st. Fill out online recruiting questionnaires and follow that up with a personalized email. Click here to read our article on how to email college baseball coaches
  • Call college coaches and ask them what positions they’re looking for
  • Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center
  • Take the ACT/SAT. By now you should know the required scores for schools you want to attend, if you need to retake the test do so. Avoid taking the spring test as they will interfere with the end of your high school season or the beginning of summer baseball.

    Stay ahead with your schoolwork so you don't end up like this guyStay ahead of your schoolwork so you don’t end up like this guy

Winter

  • Train hard or play another sport and begin your throwing program after taking a 10-12 week break from throwing in the fall
  • Continue to take challenging classes and perform well in the classroom. This would be a good time to take an ACT/SAT prep class if you need to retake either test.
  • Plan visits to schools during the spring and summer. Ask coaches about their programs Junior Day

Spring

  • Send college coaches your high school schedule and compete hard.
  • Hit the gym to maintain strength and focus on nutrition. Track your meals and caloric intake.
  • Finish strong in the classroom. Round out your strong ACT/SAT scores with a good GPA.

Summer

  • Continue to play the best competition as possible
  • Attend college baseball camps and showcases
  • Let schools you’ve been in contact with know your summer baseball tournament schedule and if you”ll be attending any of their camps
  • Continue to work hard in the weight room. By now you should be able to look at the schools you want to play at and compare your size and ability to their current roster.
  • Monitor your bodyweight. Make sure you’re getting enough calories and staying hydrated.
  • July 1st, phone contact initiated by the college coach is allowed.

Senior

Whether you have offers or not, continue to focus on getting better. Players with offers should focus on getting more. Also keep in mind you’re still competing for academic and athletic scholarship money. Once you have an offer, your work is not done. If you don’t have D1 offers or personal emails and phone calls at this point, it’s time to consider D2, D3, JUCO, and NAIA.

Read: 5 Reasons To Consider Playing JUCO Baseball

Fall

  • Do not let up academically. Review the core requirements with your counselor and make sure you’re still on track
  • Schedule official and unofficial visits. You’re only allowed 5 official visits
  • If you haven’t signed your LOI(Letter of Intent) yet, research senior showcases and continue to contact coaches.
  • Let college coaches that you’ve rejected know ASAP.

Winter

  • Early signing period
  • Submit your financial aid forms
  • Send your transcripts to the NCAA
  • Send out your spring schedule to your narrowed list of college coaches

Spring

  • Enjoy your last high school baseball season, leave it all out on the field!
  • If you haven’t committed yet, get in touch with D3, NAIA, and JUCO coaches and send them your schedule.

Summer

  • If you’ve committed, figure out your schools summer workout program. If not, narrow your search to local lower level D2, D3, JUCO, and NAIA schools. Less competitive schools will continue to look throughout the summer meaning you still have a chance.
  • play 18U and get in shape for fall workouts
  • learn as much about your school, be prepared to be a student-athlete!

Conclusion

Google yourself, make sure your image is clean on social media(Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Etc.). Remember academics is the reason you’re going to college. Pick a school that fits your needs off the field. Did you find the college baseball recruiting timeline? If so, sign up to our email list below and you”ll get helpful advice on how to play college baseball.

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